WIRED Breaks Down Food Network Recipe Trends, Determines Bacon is a Miracle Ingredient

WIRED crunched 49,733 recipes and 906,539 comments from foodnetwork.com, and the results are riveting.

  • WIRED found that when you crunch the data for all recipes, those with bacon rate higher.(Photo:
  • Recipes with more ingredients get better ratings. (Photo:
  • The people love Sandwich King host Jeff Mauro's recipes, as well as those by The Barefoot Contessa. (Photo:
  • Apple and pumpkin pie recipes dominate foodnetwork.com.(Photo:
  • San Francisco and New York share a love for mojitos, while Los Angeles prefers chicken pot pie. (Photo:
  • With 763 billion possible Food Network meals, you really don't have an excuse to be uninspired in the kitchen. (Photo:

WIRED has been killing it with their food-related coverage as of late. The tech magazine just partnered with Food Network and crunched 49,733 recipes and 906,539 comments from foodnetwork.com, and the results are riveting. “One of the many amazing things you can with big-ish data is give precise questions to answers that always seemed so subjective,” WIRED points out. And by crunching the massive amounts of recipe-related numbers, they have determined a slew of fascinating findings on the biggest food fads, celebrity chefs, thanksgiving recipes, and what foods people in different regions in the U.S. are interested in. Here’s a few highlights:

  • Recipes that include bacon generally rate higher. Although, that’s not the case with pasta and dessert. 
  • Food with more ingredients gets better ratings.
  • There are 280 ways to grill a steak on the Food Network website.
  • It would take you 89,963 hours to cook every recipe on foodnetwork.com.
  • Jeff Mauro’s recipes have the highest ratings overall, Rachel Ray’s have the lowest.
  • Almost 1/4 of Food Network’s 468 pie recipes are apple pie recipes.
  • Chili recipes are most popular in: El Paso, TX; Plano, TX; Louisville, KY.

Click through the gallery to check out the nifty WIRED infographics, which give a fascinating overview of how Americans cook.

[via WIRED]

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