The World’s Elite Like to Do Business Over Guacamole and Boxed Brownies

This dinner series sounds like a #mook excuse to get wasted with fellow members of the upper crust.

Photo:  Facebook

Photo: Facebook

It takes a certain level of audacity to throw a dinner series with a name. It takes an even greater level of audacity to openly call it “The Influencers Dinner,” which is the subject of a profile in Forbes. Jon Levy, the director of digital strategy at Rodale Grow, is doing just that. He held his first dinner party four years ago and was incredibly disappointed at how “everyone was too accomplished.” Levy says, “The moment people started talking about their careers, they felt overly important. Everyone had fun, but it lacked the experience, community, and bonding I was hoping for.”

That is why the first rule (and only rule) of “The Influencers DInner” is: “For the first hour, nobody is allowed to talk about who they are or what they do for a living.”

So who exactly gets an invite to this exclusive and elusive dinner party? According to the author of the Forbes article and dinner party guest Seth Porges, ”None of the guests know each other. Few even know their host. Each of the guests had arrived after receiving a rather cryptic email inviting them to [the event].”

Like the world really needs another impenetrable circle of elite people doing elite things together.

The nine invited guests at each party has included everyone from Cameron Winklevoss, to Broadway actors, internet moguls, and famous musicians. Levy hopes “to use his network of past dinner guests in order to launch a private social network of sorts, designed to encourage dinner veterans to use their own platforms and networks to help each other.” Like the world really needs another impenetrable circle of elite people doing elite things together.

Really, the dinner party series just sounds like a somewhat douchey excuse to get wasted with fellow members of the upper crust—especially since no one at the dinner party seems to care about the food. Porges recounts how the guests “make guacamole together [and] transform a box of brownie mix into the evening’s dessert.” That’s right, of the maybe four food references in the entire Forbes article, two are about guacamole, one is about tacos, and the last one is about boxed brownie mix. That’s the dinner we make on the days where we don’t feel like wearing pants while watching absurd amount of Netflix documentaries—not forging world changing ideas with other “influencers.”

[via Forbes]

 

  • Denise

    This is fascinating. It’s great to find people who are doing extraordinary things and get them together, but it doesn’t have to be so private and closed-off. You can do more than just have a dinner with these people each time. You can get these types of people together for a seminar or conversation open to the public. Universities invite important people to talk all the time. Ben Levy can do more with this energy and intelligence. He can do more to work with the public and charities when he rounds of these people.

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