Sunday #Longreads: Our Favorite Stories of the Week

Spend your sunday reading some exceptional food writing, recommended by the FWF team.

Photo: Liz Barclay

Photo: Liz Barclay

Each Sunday, the FWF team selects the most inspiring, enlightening, and fascinating stories from the previous week. Spend your day of rest reading some exceptional food journalism.

Chef John Currence Wants to Save Mississippi from Itself [via BuzzFeed]

On the eve of the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, Mississippi is enacting a law that could sanction anti-LGBT discrimination. John Currence, the state’s most prominent chef, is working to keep his adoptive home from repeating its ugly past.—Erin Mosbaugh 

Anthony Bourdain’s Theory on the Foodie Revolution [via Smithsonian Mag]

Bourdain on Instagram: “Chefs bitch about it when it’s going on in their restaurants, yet when they go out to dinner, they’re taking pictures of everything. And any notion that that’s sharing? It’s bullshit. It’s about making other people feel bad about what they’re eating. And a certain knowledge that what you’re eating is more interesting.” Read the full interview for more enlightening Bourdainisms.—Erin Mosbaugh 

Inside Monsanto, America’s Third-Most-Hated Company [via Bloomberg]

According to public opinion polls, the company that has become the public face of GMOs is considered nearly as disreputable as BP and Bank of America. Drake Bennett’s reportage digs into what Monsanto actually does, why it has drawn so much criticism, and how—in some cases—it is misunderstood. “The argument over Monsanto is an argument, in part, over whether the same companies that gave us today’s food system can also give us tomorrow’s,” writes Bennett.—Chris Schonberger

A Kinder Shade of Pale (Ale) [via Wall Street Journal]

Milder in character and lower in alcohol than the potent IPAs we’ve grown accustomed to, ‘sessionable’ American pale ales are perfect for summer. “The latest American pale ales remain patriotically hop-forward but have taken a revolutionary dulcet turn. How? New hops, new methods,” explains writer William Bostwick.—Erin Mosbaugh

Is a hot dog a sandwich? [via Guardian]

Shout out to Jeb Lund for dropping 1,500+ on this critical topic. A sample: “The hot dog qua hot dog thus becomes a patriotic novelty – and slamming the door on any debate over its place in a pre-existing internationalist universe of sandwiches allows us to avoid confronting other issues, like the changing nature of what it is to be American.” God bless thinkpieces, and God bless America.—Chris Schonberger

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