Show Us Your Food Porn: Andrew Scrivani

The New York Times Dining section regular shares his 10 favorite shots and explains the art of memorable food photography.

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It's tempting for a layman to think that beautiful food photos pretty much take themselves, and that all a photographer needs to do is find some decent light and start clicking. But one need only study the work of New York shutterbug Andrew Scrivani to dispel that misconception and reveal how a strong personal style can make an image not merely pretty, but also impossible to forget.

Scrivani's signature dark and moody shots, inspired by the famed Dutch masters, have made him a brand name in the world of food photography—a brooding counterpoint to the sunny, idealistic shots that grace so many glossy magazines. Sam Sifton was one of his earliest fans, sending him on countless assignments after running an image of pearly congee made and shot by the photographer on the front page of the New York Times Dining section nearly a decade ago. He's been a Grey Lady fixture ever since.

Scrivani first tried his hand behind the lens as a bored lit major at Baruch College, enrolling in photo classes at the School of Visual Arts across the street. And, boy, are we glad he stuck with photography.

From regular gigs with the Times to shoots for ABC's The Chew, Scrivani approaches food with an in-your-face attitude, whether he's capturing the intensity of a chef at work or taking us up-close-and-personal with a glistening julep cup. He also never forgets the primal power of food porn: "Our ability as food photographers to capture food in a way that really makes it an object of desire is the key to our craft." Amen.

Here, Scrivani breaks down his 10 favorite shots from his portfolio and offers insight into how he adapts his style for different assignments.

Follow Andrew on Instagram (@andrewscrivani) and check out his website here.

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