As our food culture has undergone seismic changes in the past few decades—as Food Network has stormed the gates of pop culture and chefs have been transformed into gods—the cute little word “foodie” has been forced to carry a heavier burden than perhaps it was ever intended to.

Now there’s a new linguistically-lazy self descriptor in our midst, thanks to a laughable press release we recently received for a site called Foodie-Trips.com. Thank you, PR wordsmiths, for introducing “Culinado” into our lexicon. Apparently, Culinados (an unfortunate synthesis of culinary and aficionado), “leave the traditional ‘Foodies’ in their wake when it comes to culinary knowledge and passion.” So now, according to the Foodie-Trips.com reps, it’s just not damn good enough to be a foodie. Or, as they like to put it, foodies are “no longer the top of the food chain.”

In order to place yourself in the superior Culinado category, you must live in a coastal city but forage tirelessly for ingredients like truffles and lobster, hate on Gordon Ramsay, “desire secret recipes handed down through generations,” and be a general asshole. 

Here are some characteristics/thoughts that define a Culinado (according to the release):

  • “Gordon Ramsay and Jamie Oliver are passé. the Culinado wants to learn directly from the highly sought-after niche specialists such as multi- Michelin starred Italian chef Ricardo de Prà and Dakota Soifer from Colorado”
  • “Move over farmers markets… the Culinado wants to hunt for their own ingredients.  From hunting truffles in Italy, to clam digging and fishing their own lobsters in Canada’s Prince Edward Island, they want hands-on experiences.”
  • “typically based in larger towns and cities such as Washington D.C., Seattle, San Francisco, London, New York and Los Angeles where they can source specialist ingredients and spend time in the company of like-minded, passionate food lovers.”

Barf.

But, hey, you know what makes people buy stuff like overpriced “culinary adventures”? Feeling inferior and being pumped with self doubt. So basically, this press release is spot-on. At the same time, we’re feeling SMDH towards the term Culinado, and we love trolling this PR company. Plus, the term sounds like some sort of diabetes-inducing Frappucino or Coolatta beverage.

If you need to know, like, RIGHT NOW whether you’re a more evolved “culinado” or just a plain old foodie, a.k.a. pleb, a.k.a. inferior human being, you can take this ridiculous test. Sample questions below. Study up!

praceviche

Here’s the full press release, for your enjoyment, below.

Culinados replace Foodies as the new Food Obsessives

A new culinary demographic has emerged in the USA that reveals a generation of food obsessives even more demanding of their cooking and culinary experiences than the traditional ‘foodie’.

The Culinado (a blend of the terms culinary and aficionado) is so passionate about food and culinary skills that they prefer new cooking experiences to spending quality, or private, time with their partner. In fact, when it comes to spending cash, they would rather splurge out on new ingredients, food travel or cookery classes than gadgets, clothes, shoes or items for the house.

Additional Culinado traits established by the study from Foodie-Trips.com include:

  • ·        The Real Chefs – Gordon Ramsay and Jamie Oliver are passé. the Culinado wants to learn directly from the highly sought-after niche specialists such as multi- Michelin starred Italian chef Ricardo de Prà and Dakota Soifer from Colorado
  • ·        Organic & home-grown – move over farmers markets… the Culinado wants to hunt for their own ingredients.  From hunting truffles in Italy, to clam digging and fishing their own lobsters in Canada’s Prince Edward Island, they want hands-on experiences.
  • ·        Unique Recipes – They crave unique dishes and no longer want the bestselling cook-book; they desire secret recipes handed down through generations; from a gîte owner in Provence, to a café owner in Milan.
  • ·        Mini breaks – The Culinado actively seeks out food-orientated experiences; it doesn’t matter how far or how much, the objective is to learn more and create new dishes that continually challenge the Culinado.
  • ·        Location –  typically based in larger towns and cities such as Washington D.C., Seattle, San Francisco, London, New York and Los Angeles where they can source specialist ingredients and spend time in the company of like-minded, passionate food lovers.

The observational study[i] was compiled by Foodie-Trips.com, an organizer of exclusive and bespoke worldwide culinary adventures.  Lisa Sanguedolce, founder of Foodie-Trips.com comments:

“Over the past seven years, we have seen a marked change in the passion for food and culinary skills amongst many of our Foodie-Trips.com travelers and store customers. Like a sommelier, the Culinado has a natural feel or ‘nose’ for combining ingredients.  At Foodie-Trips.com, we believe that theCulinado is a modern master of food and will challenge the quality of chefs, restaurateurs and food critics in the near future.  It’s the reason why we now create bespoke culinary adventures across the world; we’re ensuring that we meet the demand from a new group of developing Culinados in addition to the traditional food-lovers.”

Foodie-Trips.com also found that the Culinado demographic is predominantly women with an over-riding passion for food, cooking and the senses that surround the eating experience. These women are determined to explore their desire for everything food-related across the globe, and they blend an appreciation of fine foods with a deeper understanding of the origin of ingredients, and the complexity of cooking techniques across different cultures.

Foodie-Trips.com offers exclusive and bespoke worldwide culinary adventures at reasonable prices.  Each trip is carefully crafted to ensure its uniqueness, offering a blend of education and entertainment with a sprinkling of marvel and awe.  From foraging for mushrooms across the Dolomite Mountains with a Michelin starred chef, to creating real croissants in Paris, Foodie-Trips aims to create memories and unsurpassed experiences for food lovers across the USA, Europe and Canada.

The Foodie-Trips.com Menu                   Destination                      $CAN                $US                 £UK

Mon Sept 15th – Fri Sept 19th 2014        A Sweet Tour of Paris     $1,850.00        $1,750.00       £1,010.00   (excludes flights & hotel)

Mon Sept 29th – Sat Oct 4th 2014           Northern Italy                  $4,227.00        $3,912.50       £2,305.00   (excludes flights)

Mon May 11th – Fri May 15th 2015        A Sweet Tour of Paris     $1,850.00        $1,750.00       £1,010.00   (excludes flights & hotel)

Mon May 18th – Sat May 23rd 2015       Northern Italy                  $4,227.00        $3,912.50       £2,305.00   (excludes flights)