What’s In a Name: The Origins of 26 Famous Cocktails

Find out how tipples like the Hurricane, Zombie, and Tom Collins got their names.

A rose by any other name would smell as sweet; a Long Island Ice Tea would be as deadly. But the etymology of certain cocktails is pretty interesting nonetheless, as explained in this episode of Mental Floss’ The List Showa trivia web series by author John Green.

While it’s not that surprising that a coffee-colored vodka drink became known as a Black Russian, the video contains more than a few tidbits that you can impress your bartender with.

Location names

Irish Coffee 354x500 Whats In a Name: The Origins of 26 Famous Cocktails
[Photo: By Marler via Wikimedia Commons]

The Alabama Slammer was invented in Alabama, but the Irish Car Bomb was invented in Connecticut. Irish coffee, however, did come from Ireland—it was created by a bartender at an airport restaurant in the 40s.

People names

bloodymary Whats In a Name: The Origins of 26 Famous Cocktails[Photo: flickr.com/light_seeker]

The Bloody Mary was named after a real person but the Tom Collins wasn’t—it was the name of a common practical joke from the 1870s.

Literal names

oranges Whats In a Name: The Origins of 26 Famous Cocktails[Photo: By Stux via Pixabay]

Engineers created the Screwdriver when they poured vodka into OJ cans and used the hand tool to mix the two together. But you’ll be pleased to know the Fuzzy Navel has nothing to do with anatomy—it’s named for its ingredients, fuzzy peaches and navel oranges.

[via Mental Floss]

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